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Tazewell Primary Title I Plan
Posted On:
Thursday, September 26, 2019

Division Name: Tazewell County Public Schools                                 

School Name: Tazewell Primary School                                                      

Date: September 20, 2019    

Select One:          Initial Plan                   Revision                                    

 

Component 1 §1114(b)(6):

A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that takes into account information on the academic achievement of children in relation to the challenging state academic standards, particularly the needs of those children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing, to meet the challenging state academic standards and any other factors as determined by the local educational agency.

 

Narrative:

             Tazewell Primary (TPS) PK-2, formerly Tazewell Elementary (TES) PK-5, is a school-wide Title I school.   During the 2019-2020 school year, 100% of the students will receive free and reduced lunches due to a grant from the School Nutrition Program. A “super snack” will also be provided each day through the Virginia 365 Project.

Tazewell Primary School’s population is identified as 72% white, 22% African American, 4% bi-racial, 1% Hispanic/Latino and 1% Asian.

Test data from the past and present indicates that economically disadvantaged students and special education students at Tazewell Elementary School struggled to find success on standardized and criterion referenced tests. This makes it very important that there are strong Title I and Special Education teams within the school. The school is presently accredited in both Reading and Math. This year TPS became a feeder school for Tazewell Intermediate School (TIS), grades 3-5. Based on the 2019 SOL data for Tazewell Elementary, disadvantaged students had a pass rate of 81.08% in Reading and 97.26% in Math. Students with disabilities had a pass rate of 77.78% in Reading and 95.0% in Math. Virginia Studies scores for these groups were 95.65% for disadvantaged and 80% for students with disabilities. Science scores were 71.43% and 100% respectively. Until further data becomes available, these two groups will remain the primary focus of TPS for 2019-2020.

             A Title I County Survey and Title I School Survey were given to parents of Tazewell Elementary School during the 2018-2019 school year. Responses from these surveys were evaluated and the input is being used for the 2019-2020 Title I plan. Approximately 500 surveys were sent to parents. A Teacher Survey developed by the Title I Staff was also given to staff members for additional help in identifying student and program needs. The results of these surveys were discussed with stakeholders at the first Title I Plan Committee Meeting.

             One of greatest areas of concern expressed by the committee after reviewing the survey data was to increase parent involvement through additional events with the help of the Title I Staff. Additional means of communication between the school and stakeholders was an area of needed improvement. A continued use of the DOJO app to promote meetings, events, information from Title I, and feedback from teachers about students on a routine basis was recommended.   Twitter, Facebook, Remind, and the school webpage have been used effectively this year and will continue.   It was determined that meetings would be held at different times of the day to encourage better attendance from stakeholders. The three Parent and Family Engagement Meetings this year will include an a.m., noon, and p.m. meeting. In October, Title I will host a parent/student game night, “Practicing Reading and Math Skills with Board Games”. “Snow Excited About Math” will be the focus at the December meeting with an emphasis on real-world math. In March 2020, a reading-based meeting entitled “We Can Read” to celebrate Dr. Seuss will showcase students’ reading success Reader’s Theater style. The addition of Webinar and/or recorded presentations available for viewing is planned for the March meeting. Transportation will also be offered for the March meeting.

            Strengths noted by these surveys included: satisfaction with teachers, staff, administration and the Title I program (94%), awareness of the standards taught and the overall instructional program (95%), and high expectations/progress of students (96%).

             Based on combined MAP results for Tazewell Primary School and Tazewell Intermediate School, additional reading services including workshop and direct instruction in first and second grades have been determined as a need. The greatest need lies with 2nd grade students. Test results reveal only 39% are at grade level. Reading for these students will be a high priority.   With first grade at only 62% on grade level, these students also need additional services in reading. Orton-Gillingham trained professionals will be servicing select students in the 0-9% range based on reading MAP scores. Pending PALS testing of Kindergarten students in Fall 2019 for additional baseline data, students at-risk will be identified for services.

 

Tazewell Elementary School Spring 2019 MAP Reading Deciles

1st Grade (2019 - 2020 School Year) 100 tested                                                                                                                                               63% of students are above 50th percentile

0-9%

10-19%

20-29%

30-39%

40-49%

50-59%

60-69%

70-79%

80-89%

90-99%

3

inc. 1 SWD

8

4

10

Inc. 1 SWD

12

Inc. 1 SWD

17

5

11

inc. 1 SWD

18

12

 

2nd Grade (2019 - 2020 School Year) 112 tested                                                                                                                                                  39% of students are above 50th percentile

0-9%

10-19%

20-29%

30-39%

40-49%

50-59%

60-69%

70-79%

80-89%

90-99%

15

inc. 5 SWD

21

inc. 1 SWD

10

Inc. 1 SWD

9

13

9

5

12

Inc. 1 SWD

7

11

 

 

             In addition, special education subgroup test results reveal that there are students in need of reading remediation. Title I will fill in gaps as needed after Special Education services are given.         

              The Commonwealth of Virginia provides the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS), as a tool for Virginia’s Early Intervention Reading Initiative.   It is used by 99% of school districts in Virginia on a voluntary basis. PALS consists of three instruments: PALS-PreK (for preschool students), PALS-K (for kindergartners), and PALS 1-3 (for students in Grades 1-2). PALS assessments are designed to identify students in need of additional reading instruction beyond what is provided to typical developing readers. PALS screening takes place at the beginning and end of the school year. Current PALS data confirms the need for Title I Reading services in the first and second grades for 2019-2020. Kindergarten will be PALS tested in the fall to identify students in need of Title I services.

 

 

 

Budget Implications:

·         Orton-Gillingham Training for staff involved with program (select students 0-9% in Reading)

·         Title I Personnel to service all grades identified in need of Title I services

·         Direct Instruction/ Corrective Reading personnel and materials to serve identified students

·         Special Education Personnel to service all grades identified in need of Special Ed services

·         Title I Parent Involvement Funds for Parent and Family Engagement Meetings/ Activities/ Meals

·         Transportation for parents to attend a Parent and Family Engagement Meeting

·         Flex time for additional hours required for planning and activities

·         Grant renewal for funding and staffing of PALS program

·         Math/Board Games for October FEM

·         Calculators and Play Money for December FEM

·         Reader’s Theater props for March FEM

Benchmark/Evaluation:

·         MAPS, PALS, and SOL Testing Data

·         Reading Mastery, Direct Instruction, and Orton-Gillingham ongoing assessments

·         Workshop Data Profile (K-3) updated 3 times/year on Office 365

·         Sign-up sheets for participation in Parent and Family Engagement Meetings

·         Parent and Family Engagement Meeting Agenda or Minutes of the Meetings

·         Survey results for 2109-2020

·         Records of teacher use and parent use of DOJO app and REMIND apps

 

Component 2 §1114(b)(7)(A)(i):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children, including each of the subgroups of students (as defined in section 1111(c)(2)) to meet the challenging state academic standards.

 

Narrative:

             The Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) provides a Measurement of Academic Progress assessment in Reading and Math that is widely used in the United States. The assessment was given at Tazewell Elementary in September 2018, November 2018, and April 2019 and measures student progress on a nationally normed scale in RITs, or Rasch Units.

              For 2019-2020, these tests will provide grade level teams with the information necessary to plan for one-hour blocks in both reading workshops and whole group reading instruction given by classroom teachers. In differentiated small group reading workshops, students have a better opportunity to gain mastery in specific reading skills. Administration organizes the workshops by identifying which students will work with trained personnel for the 60-minute block.

             Tazewell Primary School uses the SRA Imagine It! as the school-wide research-based reading program. Students in grades K-2 receive a minimum of two hours of daily reading instruction. One hour of instruction is considered whole group, while the second hour is considered workshop. Students are grouped by ability during the workshop hour to enhance reading skills with peers on a similar ability level.

            Direct Instruction is a Tier 2 intervention.   Direct Instruction is an additional 60 minutes of intensive, focused reading instruction outside the reading block. Groups are assigned based on the DI screening. DI screening takes place in the Spring. Students showing 2-3 year deficits are screened with the DI model and then placed with an appropriate skill-leveled group for the ensuing school year. Once students have proven mastery based on scoring at or above the 60th percentile on the MAP test, students may be removed from the DI program. Based on the 2019 Spring Reading MAP scores, 12 students have been identified for Direct Instruction services and 6 have been identified for Orton Gillingham in the 2019-2020 school year. Kindergarten students may qualify for services after testing begins in the fall.  

                The Spring 2019 MAP Math data suggests a need for remediation. Committee members expressed concern for the large number of students in 1st (54/102 students), 2nd grade (51/114 students), that fall at or below the 50th percentile. Title I math services are greatly needed in first and second grades during the 2019-2020 school year. Pending VKRP testing of Kindergarten students in Fall 2019 for baseline data, additional students at-risk will be identified for math services.

Tazewell Elementary School Spring 2019 MAP Math Deciles

1st Grade (2019 - 2020 School Year) 45 tested                                                                                                                                                 56% of students are above 50th percentile

0-9%

10-19%

20-29%

30-39%

40-49%

50-59%

60-69%

70-79%

80-89%

90-99%

10

inc. 2 SWD

11

9

11

4

9

inc. 1 SWD

14

inc. 1 SWD

12

11

11

 

2nd Grade (2019 - 2020 School Year) 74 tested                                                                                             54% of students are above 50th percentile

0-9%

10-19%

20-29%

30-39%

40-49%

50-59%

60-69%

70-79%

80-89%

90-99%

5

inc. 1 SWD

7

inc. 2 SWD

 

11

17

inc. 1 SWD

11

inc. 1 SWD

19

inc. 1 SpEd

9

13

8

14

 

                                   

            Another formative assessment given to students is a benchmark test provided by the Comprehensive Instructional Program (CIP). These benchmarks are created based upon the pacing guide from the Virginia Department of Education SOL Blueprints available online. These benchmarks are given at regular intervals throughout the year. At the end of each benchmark, a report is generated for every student to identify those who have not mastered SOL content. Teachers use this information to remediate students during the regular school day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budget Implications:

·         Reading Mastery personnel and materials to serve identified students

·         Orton-Gillingham training and materials for staff involved with program (select students with 0-9% Reading MAP score)

·         Additional training in reading and math for 2nd and 3rd grade personnel to increase student performance

·         CIP training for primary grades (pacing & available resources)

Benchmark/Evaluation:

·         MAPS, PALS, and SOL Testing Data

·         Reading Mastery, Direct Instruction, Corrective Reading and Orton-Gillingham ongoing assessments

·         Workshop Data Profile (K-3) updated 3 times/year on Office 365

·         Periodic Lesson Gain Charts for D.I. and Corrective Reading

·         Observations by D.I. personnel

·         Administrative Walkthroughs/ Observations

·         Remediation Logs

·         Report Cards

·         Professional Development/ Training hours related to reading and math

 

 

 

 

 

 

Component 3 §1114(b)(7)(ii):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that use methods and instructional strategies that strengthen the academic program in the school; increase the amount and quality of learning time; and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, which may include programs, activities, and courses necessary to provide a well-rounded education.

Narrative:

 

           Students below the 20th percentile on the MAP test receive an additional 1 hour of reading instruction for a total of three hours per day. These struggling students receive Direct Instruction, Reading Mastery, Corrective Reading, or Orton-Gillingham instruction during the third hour of reading.   A language component with the Imagine It! program is added to instruction for an additional 30 minutes each day. Title I staff members have taken on a vital role of assisting with the Imagine It! program of study during Reading Workshops and Direct Instruction Groups.

 

             Students in grades PK-2 spend 30 minutes each day in the computer lab with reading and math-based programs that monitor students’ progress daily.   The IXL Math/Language technology, Mathseeds, Reading Eggs, and ABC ya! programs will be used by classroom teachers to target the weakest skills in reading and math and also challenge the more advanced students.   The Enhancing Education through Technology State Program, Title II Part D, maintains the technology used in classrooms. SMARTBoards and document cameras are in every classroom. Computers are all located in one central section of the school. Administration schedules all classes a daily time for computer use.

 

            As a recommendation of the Title I Schoolwide Plan Committee, Title I instructors will work with students within the regular classrooms and small groups for math remediation in grades K-2. Students will be selected for math remediation based on CIP Benchmarks, PALS reading/VKRP math data, and informal teacher assessments. Title I will also provide daily instruction for reading workshops/classes and DI/Corrective Reading instruction for all students as needed. Second grade will be given first consideration in the 2019-2020 Master Schedule. PALS data and 2019 MAP data will be used for these groupings. Classroom teachers use data from these assessments (along with other data previously mentioned) to move students into more effective reading groups, to implement RTI processes, and to document students’ level of instruction for small group remediation.

            Classroom teachers plan with support personnel that work with small groups during workshop time. Instructional plans are developed using differentiation based on the reading level of the group. These groups include: special education, regular education, and gifted education students. Based on changes in various data, students in regular education instructional groups can be moved.

             Grade-level teams and individual teachers regularly use all available data to make ongoing curriculum decisions throughout the year. The Title I staff is often scheduled a 20-minute period each day to assist students in K-1 with vocabulary development.

The principal and assistant principal create the basic master schedule.   The Title I staff works closely with administration to schedule Title I classes. The Title I Schoolwide Plan Committee members have offered suggestions for the master schedule in order to utilize instructional time more effectively.

             After collectively looking at all the data presented, the committee decided that the greatest need will be first and second grades in Math and Reading.

           Beginning in the 2018-2019 school year, the state implemented attendance criteria for school accreditation. To meet the requirements, students must be present 90% of the total number of school days. In a 180-day school year, this means that a student may not miss more than 18 days, regardless of the circumstances. The trend in data for Tazewell Elementary revealed concern for meeting this goal. A schoolwide SMART Goal to improve attendance and meet this new criteria for accreditation began in September 2018. This goal also included teacher attendance., although it is not part of school accreditation criteria. Quality substitutes are in short supply throughout the county. During teacher absences, students are not receiving the benefits of a highly qualified teacher for instruction on those days.   Including teachers in this goal provided motivation to improve teacher absenteeism.

         The committee has decided to continue this SMART Goal for 2019-2020 and make monthly attendance an ongoing priority.   This year, results of attendance will be posted at individual classroom doors. The focus will be to reward perfect attendance for classrooms as a whole. Title I, with the help of administration, will be responsible for the implementation of this goal.

          A new SMART Goal will be added to the Schoolwide Plan for 2019-2020. Based on surveys and data, increased involvement of parents, stakeholders and the school community will be the new SMART Goal. After lengthy discussions, the committee members came up with five strategies to meet this goal: plan Meet and Greet sessions for new families to disseminate information relative to TPS, expand the use of Digital Media by Tazewell Primary teachers to present information about classroom activities, encourage teachers/staff to participate in community outreach projects (i.e. Little League night), research reading incentive programs (either online or through the local library) to promote increased reading at home, and develop a brochure with Title I information involving staff, services, resources, and activities to be placed in the main office.

 

 

Budget Implications:

·         Sufficient staffing for reading workshops

·         Staffing and Training for DI, Corrective Reading, and Orton-Gillingham instruction

·         Adequate staffing for small group math instruction

·         Continued funding for MAP testing

·         Continued upgrades for computer labs and technology

·         Rewards/ Incentives for attendance SMART Goals

·         Funds for developing/ printing brochures

·         Funds for media items to be given during reading community events

Benchmark/Evaluation:

·         Computer Lab Usage Forms

·         Principal/ Assistant Principal Walkthroughs/ Observations

·         Workshop Data Profile (K-3)

·         Computer Schedules

·         Completed Computer Logs

·         Weekly Lesson Plans

·         IXL, Reading Eggs, and Mathseeds Student Reports

·         CIP Benchmark Reports

·         PALS, SOL, & MAP Data

·         Teacher Informal Observations/Assessments

·         RTI Data/ At-Risk Summaries

·         Individual Education Plans

·         D.I. & Corrective Reading Reports

·         Tutoring Logs

·         2019-2020 Monthly Attendance results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Component 4 §1114(b)(7)(iii):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of those at risk of not meeting the challenging state academic standards, through activities which may include—

§  Counseling, school-based mental health programs, specialized instructional support services, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ skills outside the academic subject areas;

§  Preparation for and awareness of opportunities for postsecondary education and the workforce, which may include career and technical education programs and broadening secondary school students’ access to coursework to earn postsecondary credit while still in high school (such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual or concurrent enrollment, or early college high schools);

§  Implementation of a schoolwide tiered model to prevent and address problem behavior, and early intervening services, coordinated with similar activities and services carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);

§  Professional development and other activities for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other school personnel to improve instruction and use of data from academic assessments, and to recruit and retain effective teachers, particularly in high-need subjects; and

§  Strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs and, if programs are consolidated, the specific state educational agency and local education agency programs and other federal programs that will be consolidated in the schoolwide program.

 

Narrative:

         Tazewell Primary teachers are regularly involved in professional development. The Title I Schoolwide Plan Committee offers suggestions to assist administration in planning professional development opportunities based on an analysis of test data derived from the 2019 spring SOL testing cycle, PALs testing, and MAP testing. Additionally, the staff has been surveyed for ideas on meaningful topics to enhance the skills and knowledge of the staff for increased student achievement.   Teachers are required to complete 6 days or 24 hours of professional development each year as part of the 200-day contract.

             After data and survey analysis, it was determined that topics for professional development in 2019-2020 will include: Focusing on Math Strands (K-3) to Improve Student Performance, Strategies to Increase Attendance, Ways to Increase Parent Involvement in the School, Creating Digital Resources to Relay Information/ Homework Strategies for Parents and Students. A variety of PD 360 videos are also available to address individual teacher needs. The county has on-line workshops that can be completed for points toward teacher licensure renewal. Information is also sent to teachers about college course offerings by local higher education entities.

             New teachers are paired with mentors. Scheduled meetings are held for training by Central Office staff throughout the year. Collaborative logs from weekly meetings between the teacher and mentor are submitted monthly.

             Two county Reading Coaches are available throughout the year for additional training, modeling, observation of lessons, and follow-up grade-level feedback sessions to offer suggestions and strategies for improvement.

Tazewell Primary is able to offer two full-day preschool classes for up to 18 students in each through the Virginia Preschool Initiative. This pre-kindergarten program uses the academic-based curriculum known as Virginia’s Foundation Blocks. The same adopted SRA Imagine It! reading series in K-5 is also used. By incorporating SRA Imagine It! at this level, students entering Kindergarten will have a smoother transition. Al’s Pals training is offered to PreK personnel by the United Way. This program helps teach social/emotional skills, problem-solving and healthy decision making.

In addition, students in the preschool program learn the research-based Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS) expectations and rules that apply to the entire TPS student body. The acronym for Tazewell Primary Students is P.A.W.S. (Positive manners, Always be respectful, Willing to follow the rules, and Show pride).

The preschool program uses the PALS Early Literacy Assessment that is continued in Kindergarten through 3rd grade, and helps identify students in need of early intervention to become successful readers. The Kindergarten Early Literacy Skills Assessment is given in the fall and spring.

Preschool students at TES participate in all activities along with the rest of the student body.

The privately operated preschools and Head Start visit the regular Kindergarten classroom each spring to acclimate to the “big school.” Rising Kindergarten students are invited to Kindergarten Kamp for abbreviated days one week before school begins. Visitation offers students an opportunity to see the school function during a regular school day, speak with school staff/ administration, and take a tour of the building to see classes in session. During Kindergarten Kamp, students have the opportunity to ride the school bus to school, tour the building, make new friends, and learn procedures without the stress of an entire student body present.   Students go through mock schedules that includes singing, stories, playtime, snacks, social games, and other activities. This half-day, weeklong camp is taught and directed by highly qualified teachers.   Kindergarten Camp is funded by the locality.

             The Reading Foundation of Appalachia, along with Tazewell County Public Schools, promotes reading to children 20 minutes daily from birth to support the goal that all students will read at the 90th percentile by the end of 3rd grade.

             The Elgin Foundation provides dental screenings for students by local dentists in an effort to correct poor dental health. A voluntary off-campus monthly student Bible study, along with transportation and volunteer chaperones, is also provided through this foundation.

            Multiple outside agencies from the community work with Tazewell Primary students throughout the school. Heartland Rehabilitative Services of VA provides Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy. A Backpack Program is sponsored by Carilion Hospital and serviced by United Way of Southwest VA to provide underprivileged students food for the weekends. Mary Kennedy from Cumberland Mountain Mental Health Services works with the school counselor to provide additional group counseling sessions for students.   Representatives from Clinch Valley Community Action teach “These Hands are Not for Hitting” and “Good Touch/Bad Touch.” Representatives from Farm Bureau VA visit yearly to educate students on the importance of agriculture in the state. A family engagement liaison through Communities in Schools is available once a week to assist families with community resources and help with excessive absences.   Karen Ross, the Title I County Family Engagement Coordinator, works directly with the school to promote parent involvement. The Tazewell County Health Department visits the school to provide annual free vaccinations for faculty, staff, and students.

             All students at Tazewell Primary School participate in Music and Art classes weekly. Guidance, Physical Education, and Library are also part of the master schedule for every student once a week. New to Tazewell Elementary in 2018-2019 was the addition of a S.T.E.M. program.   Every three weeks, all students were given a variety of materials to complete projects in group settings.   Melissa Cumbow was the director for this project. This program will continue for the current year.

Family Preservation Services are available to assist students and families with mental health needs. TASK (Taking Action for Special Kids) is a summer enrichment program. Reading, art, music, swimming, bowling, and a personal safety program are part of this summer experience for students with disabilities. Special Olympics is a planned field trip during the school year as another day of fun activities for students with disabilities.

                           Tazewell Elementary School welcomes local college students to complete hours of observation and student teaching. Many of these students later take positions within the school as teachers, aides, developmental assistants, and substitutes. This “bridge” helps to greatly enhance the instructional program.

Tazewell Elementary School strives to create an all-inclusive, well-rounded, tiered support system that benefits and serves its students.

 

Budget Implications:

·         Tazewell County Public School Personnel for Staff Development Training

·         Reading Coach visits

·         PD 360 Videos

·         Title II Funds for Coursework

·         Funding to continue Kindergarten Camp

·         Virginia Preschool Initiative Funding

·         PALS Funding

·         Availability of Local Courses for Teacher Renewal

·         Copier Paper, Ink Cartridges, Toner, Copier Servicing, Chart Paper and Writing Supplies

·         Also continued funding for programs from: TASK, Special Olympics, William King Arts Center, Jamestown-Yorktown, Cumberland Mountain, Family Preservation, D.A.R.E. Program, Soil and Water Conservation, Virginia Extension Office 4-H, Clinch Valley Community Action and the Reading Foundation of Appalachia, Reward/Celebration funds for PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports)

·         S.T.E.M. Personnel and Materials

·         Al’s Pals training for PreK teachers

·         Funding by Carilion for the Backpack program

·         United Way of Southwest Virginia personnel for the Backpack Program

 

 

Benchmark/Evaluation:

·         Individual Teacher Log of Staff Development Hours

·         Teacher Evaluations of Programs After Presentations

·         Microsoft Office 365 Online Questionnaires (Surveys after each Staff Development Meeting)

·         Student Records/Logs for TASK and Family Preservation Services

·         CIP Results both individual and grade-level

·         Records of TCPS Preschool Attendance, Head Start Visits, and Presbyterian Preschool Visits

·         “Watchlist” of Student Data identifying those with the greatest need (updated 3 times/year)

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